How To Rebound After You File Personal Bankruptcy

Many people disapprove of bankruptcy until their personal situation changes. Situations like a job loss or a divorce can bring you to a situation where the only solution is bankruptcy. Read this article to learn more about bankruptcy and find out if filing is the best option for you.

Get a plan in place for after your bankruptcy is over. Your debt will be forgiven, but you have to find a way to make sure that your financial picture will recover. Set definite goals so that you are always working toward a financial future that will never get you in this position again.



If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

Personal bankruptcy should be a last resort if you're in insolvency. This is due to the fact that it will take years for the bankruptcy to work off your credit report and new law changes make it harder to escape paying the debts off. In other words, you could have bankruptcy on your credit report and still be paying off several of your debts.


Many people do not know that student loans are not dischargeable debt under bankruptcy laws. Do not go into your bankruptcy thinking that your student loans will be discharged, because only in cases of extreme hardship are they considered. If the job you received from pursuing your degree will never allow you to pay off your debt, you may have a chance, but it is highly unlikely.

Do not feel embarrassed or guilty about filling for bankruptcy. Many people fear that they will be treated as second class citizens after they declare themselves bankrupt. However, this is not the case. The option to 'declare yourself bankrupt' was developed by the government to enable assistance to be given to people who find themselves overwhelmed with debt and in need of a fresh start. Last year, over 1.4 million people filed bankruptcy and the majority of them are now living a happy, debt-free life. So, there is no need for you to be afraid of bankruptcy stigma.

Do not feel embarrassed or guilty about filling for bankruptcy. Many people fear that they will be treated as second class citizens after they declare themselves bankrupt. However, this is not the case. The option to 'declare yourself bankrupt' was developed by the government to enable assistance to be given to people who find themselves overwhelmed with debt and in need of a fresh start. Last year, over 1.4 million people filed bankruptcy and the majority of them are now living a happy, debt-free life. So, there is no need for you to be afraid of bankruptcy stigma.

Locate an online support forum for those who have filed for bankruptcy. This way, you can ask other people questions and find out things that you may not know. There are a lot of forums on the internet, but there are also, some offline groups you can join, if you prefer being offline. Because these people know what you're going through, they can make you feel better about the situation.

Know the facts. Contrary to popular belief, you can actually get credit after you file for bankruptcy. In fact, most who file already have very poor credit and filing for bankruptcy will put them on the only possible road to ever establishing good credit again. Your financial life will not end upon filing.

Ask Suggested Reading , and family members if they can get you out of a financial bind. This is a good way to avoid bankruptcy, and hurting your credit score. Just make sure that you have every intention of paying them back. Devise a budget plan, with them. Pay them off every month just like a bill if you have to.

Learn about adversarial proceeding. This is what results when you take out cash advances or make big ticket purchases on credit cards within ninety days of your filing date. You could very well be held responsible for the funds that have been withdrawn or purchases made once the bankruptcy is final.

Do not assume that declaring bankruptcy will leave you homeless, or without transportation. Depending on how your bankruptcy is set up, you may be able to stay in your home or keep your automobile, so long as you continue to make payments on your car loan or your mortgage.

Don't make the mistake of hesitating to file for bankruptcy because you think you won't be able to file again and may need to save it for a worse financial situation. The laws vary from state to state, but you may file again after a certain period, usually two to eight years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Of https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/bankruptcy-data-analysis , you won't want to file again, but in case of job loss or a major illness, the opportunity is there if you need it.

After filing for bankruptcy, many individuals vow they will avoid the use of credit cards and all forms of credit. Since using credit responsibly is the only way to improve your credit score, this is not such a good idea. If you do not rebuild your credit rating, you will not be able to buy a car or a home on credit again. Start with one credit card to get your credit going in the right direction.

Before filing for bankruptcy, keep in mind that child support will not be discharged in a bankruptcy case. The reason for this is that child support is a responsibility that a parent must pay. Bankruptcy does not remove that responsibility. Be sure to include any child support in your list of debts that will remain with you after the bankruptcy is discharged.

Stop using your credit card. If you are filing for bankruptcy, refrain from using your credit card a few months in advance. A court will, generally, frown upon any frivolous charges showing up on your personal bank statements. Try to keep in mind how your bank activity will appear to a judge.

There are two common types of personal bankruptcy. One in which all your assets are liquidated and the other creates a plan to pay off debts within a few years. It is recommended that you meet with an attorney to determine which type of bankruptcy is best for your particular situation.

Hopefully, this article has addressed some of your more pressing questions and fears regarding filing for personal bankruptcy. Navigating your way through the legal process and coming away with any hope can be near impossible. You need to understand that this is a temporary situation that you are in the process of resolving, and better financial times lay ahead!

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